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VOLUME 04 ISSUE 09 SEPTEMBER 2021

An Evaluation Study of The Role of Government in Community Based-Tourism Development
Dietermar Say
College of Asia Pacific Studies, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University, Oita 874-8577, Japan
DOI : https://doi.org/10.47191/ijmra/v4-i9-15

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ABSTRACT:

Supporting community based-tourism (CBT) is a development strategy for local government to use tourism to improve local people’s livelihoods. Here local government takes over the agenda for the community and supplies updates and resources on development but leaves the decision making to the community itself. However it is not just the government that designs CBT strategies, the existing literature shows that members of academia and international organizations have been carrying out, publishing and analyzing CBT case studies, thus providing more insight as to why CBT fails or succeeds in communities. In general, the tourism transformation achieved by government may not always be satisfactory to the community as opposed to academia, international organizations, or the community itself. As each community is unique, the present study examines the general attitudes of 535 respondents about government performance in CBT from 40 different countries. The respondents are divided into four groups according to the respondents’ work experience with academia, government, international organizations, and the community. The results show that the government group sees themselves as the least productive, whereas the international organization group paradoxically sees the government’s ability in CBT as the most favorable. The outcome of this study provides a general overview of the capabilities and limits of government in CBT development which may be of use to communities and stakeholders that are considering becoming involved in such transformations.

Keywords:

Community Based-Tourism (CBT); Government; Community Development; Community

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VOLUME 04 ISSUE 09 SEPTEMBER 2021

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