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VOLUME 04 ISSUE 06 JUNE 2021

Exploring causes and socio-economic impact of urban flooding on Kenema City, Eastern Sierra Leone.
Joseph Christian Adamu Mboma
Lecturer Department of Social Studies (Geography &Environmental Studies Unit) Eastern Polytechnic, Kenema.
DOI : https://doi.org/10.47191/ijmra/v4-i6-08

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ABSTRACT:

Urban flooding has not only become a major threat to Kenema City, Eastern Sierra Leone but to urban communities in the country situated on river confluence or basins. The threats included all but the following; socio-economic and above all environmental impacts. Sierra Leone records flooding every year despite strategies adopted by government and partners in mitigating its consequences on both rural and urban communities. The floods have had negative implications on urban communities’ livelihoods, infrastructure, lives and above all socio-economic activities. This paper aims at exploring causes and socio-economic impacts of urban flooding on Kenema City, Eastern Sierra Leone. Comprehensive review of related literature was drawn from individuals, co-authors with in depth experience in research and practice, and web sites for recent studies. A longitudinal research design was used to study flood incidence in the selected communities within five (5) flood disaster years. For sampling technique three (3) communities prone to flooding in the City were randomly selected. Forty-five (45) respondents were selected from the three (3) sampled communities and ten (10) recruited from stakeholders dealing with environmental issues totaling fifty-five (55). There were thirty-five (35) males and twenty (20) females. Two main methods were used; desktop literature and questionnaire. Results show that flooding has been seasonal in the study communities. Various causes of flooding in the City were outlined ranging from deforestation to lack of flood early warning signs. The socio-economic impacts included all but the following; loss of lives and property, loss of livelihood, mass unwanted migration, psychosocial effects, damage to city infrastructure, hindrance to economic growth and development, long recovery from flood events and negative political implications.

KEYWORDS:

Lambayea stream, Flood, Intensity, Disaster year and Flood prone areas.

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VOLUME 04 ISSUE 06 JUNE 2021

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